The Humanities Project Events for March 2008

Adam Frank
Adam Frank
Wednesday, March 5, 2008
Adam Frank: "Science, Myth, and the Sacred: From Eliade to Pauli"
12:00 - 1:30 p.m., Gamble Room, Rush Rhees Library

ProfessorAdam Frank of the Department of Physics and Astronomy (University of Rochester) will give a lunch-time (brown bag) lecture which will be followed by an informal discussion.

Frank's research is in the general area of Theoretical Astrophysics, and in particular the hydrodynamic and magneto-hydrodynamic evolution of matter ejected from stars. Current research topic include jets from Young Stellar Objects, bipolar outflows from evolved stars such as Planetary Nebulae and Massive stars. Investigations are carried out though the use of large scale numerical simulations. For more detail, see the Theoretical Astrophysics page.

Ennis Edmonds
Ennis Edmonds
Wednesday, March 5, 2008
Dr. Michelle Gonzalez Maldonado and Dr. Ennis Edmonds
"Conjuring History: Re-Thinking Caribbean Religious History"
5:00 p.m., Hawkins-Carlson Room, Rush Rhees Library

Professors Gonzalez-Maldanado and Edmonds will speak on their forthcoming book on Caribbean religious history and how such religious movements as Santiera, Vodun, and Rastafarianism help us to rethink African Diaspora and religious movements.

Dr. Michelle Gonzalez Maldanado is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies in the Department of Religious Studies, at the University of Miami. Prior to her position at UM she spent the past two years working with the Roman Catholic Mission in the Mayan community of San Lucas Tolimán, Guatemala. She is a Cuban-American Miami native that grew up on Key Biscayne. She received her Ph.D. in Systematic and Philosophical Theology at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California in 2001. Her research and teaching interests include Latino/a, Latin American, and Feminist Theologies, as well as inter-disciplinary work in Afro-Caribbean Studies. She is the author of Sor Juana: Beauty and Justice in the Americas (Orbis Books, 2003), Afro-Cuban Theology: Religion, Race, Culture and Identity (University Press of Florida, 2006), and Created in God's Image: An Introduction to Feminist Theological Anthropology (Orbis Books, 2007).

Dr. Ennis Edmonds teaches in the Department of Religious Studies at Kenyon College. Professor Edmonds research has focused primarily on Rastafari, leading to the recently published Rastafari: From Outcasts to Culture Bearers (Oxford University Press, 2003). He also published "Dread 'I' In-a-Babylon: Ideological Resistance and Cultural Revitalization," and "The Structure and Ethos of Rastafari" in Chanting Down Babylon: The Rastafari Reader, edited by Nathaniel S. Murrell, et al. (Temple University Press, 1998). Current research interests include the conversion of Rastas to Evangelical Christianity, the Jamaican religious group called Revival Zion, and religion in Afro-Caribbean and African American popular culture and literature.

Clavichord Strings
Thursday, Friday and Saturday, March 6 - 8, 2008
Sound Aesthetics in the Late 18th Century: German Organ and Keyboard Culture

This symposium offers an opportunity to discuss and experience new aspects of the Sound Aesthetics in the Late 18th Century. The installation of the new research organ (modeled after the 1776 Casparini organ in Vilnius in Lithuania) in Christ Church recreates a lost soundscape from the 18th century. Eastman's pedal clavichord represents the sound microcosm of the same era. Instruments are not only products of technology but also tools for creating taste and culture. These instruments will be discussed as cultural artifacts and windows onto Enlightenment technology. Distinguished international guest lecturers will present and discuss. For the first time ever we will hear a clavichord at Rush Rhees Library at the River Campus and for the last time we will hear the 1972 historic John Brombaugh organ being played in a concert in Sacred Heart Cathedral [Google map]. This organ will be moved to another venue after this concert.

Sound Aesthetics Symposium Schedule:

Lectures and Panel Discussions
Presenters: Johan Norrback, Joel Speerstra, Munetaka Yokota, Harald Vogel
Moderator: Celia Applegate
Thursday March 6, 2008
1:00 - 3:00 p.m., Hawkins-Carlson Room, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester
German Baroque Organ Music Recital
Harald Vogel, Organ
Friday March 7, 2008
7:00 p.m., Sacred Heart Cathedral, 296 Flower City park, Rochester, NY
[Google map]

Open House at Christ Church
Come see and hear the unique research organ under installation
Saturday March 8, 2008
1:00 - 3:00 p.m., Christ Church, 141 East Avenue, Rochester
[google map]
Exhibition continues through March 16, 2008
Wild By Design: Two Hundred Years of Innovation and Artistry in American Quilts
Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14607

quilt banner
Detail, late 19th century Crazy Quilt, M.M. Hernandred Ricard

For two centuries, there have been quilt makers who pushed the boundaries of tradition and functionality to create works of art for both use and display that were experimental and innovative for their time.

This exhibition was organized by the International Quilt Study Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. In Rochester, it is underwritten by Lynne Lovejoy.

Exhibition continues through March 16, 2008
Michael James: Reinventing Quilts in a Digital Age
Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14607

Michael James Quilt
Michael James, Momentum (2003). Photo: Larry Gawel

Michael James is Ardis James Professor in the Department of Textiles, Clothing and Design at the University of Nebraska Lincoln, where he teaches courses in textile design and quilt studies, and is a Faculty Fellow of the International Quilt Study Center.

James earned his MFA degree in Painting and Printmaking from the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1973, and his BFA in Painting from the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, which in 1992 conferred on him an Honorary Doctorate in Fine Arts for his work in the area of studio quilt practice. A Fellow of the American Craft Council, James's work is included in numerous collections, including the International Quilt Study Center, the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian, the Museum of Art and Design in New York, the Mint Museum, the Indianapolis Art Museum, the Racine Art Museum, and the Newark Museum. He is a recipient of several NEA Visual Artist Fellowships. His work is the subject of the monograph Michael James Studio Quilts published in 1995 in Switzerland. He has written and lectured widely and led workshops on quilt design throughout North America, Europe and Japan. As a male quilt artist he is unusual; his graphically bold art quilts are an excellent complement to the historic quilts in Wild By Design.

Fred Dicker
Fred Dicker
CANCELLED
(originally scheduled for Tuesday, March 18, 5:00 p.m.)
Fred Dicker: "2008: New York and the Presidential Election"

In 2007, Fred Dicker, the award-winning columnist and state editor of the New York Post broke the Troopergate and drivers licenses for illegal aliens program which affected the Governorship of Eliot Spitzer. In this speech, Dicker addresses the role of New York in this campaign: Hillary Clinton, Rudy Giuliani, whether the GOP can be competitive, and why the Northeast is becoming increasingly Democratic.

Open Letter logo
Open Letter
Thursday, March 20, 2008
An Open Letter Forum: The Ecosystem of Translation
3:00-5:00 p.m., Rare Books and Special Collections Room, Rush Rhees Library

This forum featuring Dr. Claudia Schaefer (Chair of Modern Languages and Cultures Department), Dr. John Michael (Chair of the English Department), Chad W. Post (Director of Open Letter), Rhea Lyons and Melissa Schoenberg (students in the Literary Translation Program and interns at Open Letter) will explore the process of becoming a literary translator. From learning how to translate, to publishing literature in translation, to teaching the art and craft of translation to others, understanding the complex and nuanced "ecosystem" that surrounds the production and promotion of is crucial to overcoming American isolationism. Highlighted in this conversation will be the University of Rochester's new literary translation programs (which Drs. Michael and Schaefer played instrumental roles in getting established and which Ms. Lyons and Schoenberg are both enrolled in) and Open Letter, the University's new literary translation publisher.

José Buscaglia-Salgado
José Buscaglia-Salgado
Monday, March 24, 2008
José F. Buscaglia-Salgado
The Dissolution of Form: Metaphorical Subjectivity in Caribbean Mulataje and the Architecture of Coloniality"
4:30 p.m., Gamble Room, Rush Rhees Library

José F. Buscaglia-Salgado is Associate Professor in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and holds an adjunct position in the departments of American Studies and Comparative Literature at SUNY Buffalo where he is also the Director of the Program in Caribbean Studies. He obtained a B.A. in History and Latin American Studies from Princeton University (1986), a Master's in Architecture (1995) and a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature (1997), both from the University at Buffalo. He is the author of Undoing Empire, Race, and Nation in the Mulatto Caribbean (Minnesota, 2003). His current book project is entitled "Perils in the Pursuit of Happiness." The book includes a carefully documented and annotated translation of The Misfortunes of Alonso Ramirez, the famous text published in Mexico City in 1690 by Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora.

About the Talk: The European Ideal is an ideological machine that has propelled modern imperial projects and national utopias from the Fall of Granada to the present. This machine is designed according to the analogical principle that equates beauty with proportion, and is assembled in accordance to an umbilical order based on the belief in geometric perfection. Its main function is to project the model of the Ideal Body that in all its possible ideological and architectural manifestations sustains the doctrine of socioracial ordering of space, or racialization, which since the 16th century has been the organizing principle and the very culture of coloniality. The contestation and subversion of the European Ideal has been a way of life from earliest times in the Caribbean. This is the aesthetic movement that I call metaphorical subjectivity in Caribbean mulataje: a practice of space that seems to have always been responding to a geography of ever-shifting boundaries, to a sort of Ishmaelite memory, and to a practice of being where bodies navigate according to a subjective trilogy or permanent triangulation that has always been less dialectical than purposefully open and ambivalent. It is not so much a frontal attack against the European Ideal as it is a movement around it. Its aim, if any, is not to destroy but to undo the calculations of racialization. This lecture traces the history and development of this practice in the architecture and the public space of the Caribbean world, from the first city of Santo Domingo to the first major, though tragic, revolution against the Ideal in Saint-Domingue/Haiti.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Modern Languages & Cultures.
For more information please contact the Department of Modern Languages & Cultures: Tel. (585) 275-5241, Email:

Michelle Gonzalez Maldanado
Michelle Gonzalez Maldanado
Wednesday, March 26, 2008
Dr. Michelle Gonzalez Maldonado (rescheduled visit)
Film Screening and discussion of Ache Moyuba Orisha: Sobre la Santeria Cubana
5:00 p.m., Gowen Room, Wilson Commons

Ache Moyuba Orisha: Sobre la Santeria Cubana, directed by Cristina Gónzalez Gallardois, is an in-depth documentary that explores the Santeria religion in Cuba. The documentary explains some of the key concepts of Santeria, and its dual roots in both Yoruba African beliefs and Catholic symbolism. Through interviews and religious ceremonies this documentary offers insight into the diverse practices of Santeria.

Ache Moyuba Orisha: Sobre la Santeria Cubana, New York : Latin American Video Archives, 1990. 42 minutes. In Spanish with English subtitles.

Dr. Michelle Gonzalez Maldanado is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies in the Department of Religious Studies, at the University of Miami. Prior to her position at UM she spent the past two years working with the Roman Catholic Mission in the Mayan community of San Lucas Tolimán, Guatemala. She is a Cuban-American Miami native that grew up on Key Biscayne. She received her Ph.D. in Systematic and Philosophical Theology at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California in 2001. Her research and teaching interests include Latino/a, Latin American, and Feminist Theologies, as well as inter-disciplinary work in Afro-Caribbean Studies. She is the author of Sor Juana: Beauty and Justice in the Americas (Orbis Books, 2003), Afro-Cuban Theology: Religion, Race, Culture and Identity (University Press of Florida, 2006), and Created in God's Image: An Introduction to Feminist Theological Anthropology (Orbis Books, 2007).

Rochester Organ
Rochester replica of a rare Casparini organ
Friday, March 28, 2008
"Tracing the Organ Masters' Secrets: The Art of Voicing Organ Pipes in Baroque Style"
4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Christ Church, 141 East Avenue, Rochester
[google map]

Master organ builder Munetaka Yokota will give a series of lectures with demonstrations in Christ Church as he voices the pipes of the new organ there.

The Organ in Society Project takes advantage of the installation of this new organ that is a precise replica of a rare Casparini organ built in 1776 in Lithuania. Upwards of nine years of research and six years of planning involving five of the top American organ builders, Steve Dieck, George Taylor, Paul Fritts, Martin Pasi and Bruce Fowkes, have culminated in the new instrument. This Casparini replica will be the first organ in the United States built completely in a late-eighteenth century northern European style and it will change our understanding of compositions from this period and earlier, including those of Johann Sebastian Bach. This new instrument has been painstakingly reproduced by international experts working at the Göteborg Organ Art Center (GOArt) in Sweden and is now largely in place in Christ Church.

Mr. Yokota's job, however, has really only just begun. This master organ voicer has begun the process of voicing each and every one of the two thousand pipes that make up the instrument. Each pipe has been carefully crafted according to Casparini's original design by the pipe makers. The art of voicing consists of physical adjustments of a variety of construction parameters of the pipes that can greatly change the sound produced and the response of the pipe to the players' pressing of the keys. In addition, the voicer must adjust and balance the sound of the instrument so that all of the pipes can complement each other and form a balanced and complete instrument.

Keyboard of Rochester Casparini replica
Saturday, March 29, 2008
Contemporary Organ Music Festival

Pre-concert talk by Dr. Matthew Suttor
5:30 p.m., Interfaith Chapel, River Campus, University of Rochester

Concert - "Organ Avant-Garde in the 1960s: The Cancelled Concert in Bremen"
Eastman Organ Students perform
7:00 p.m., Interfaith Chapel, River Campus, University of Rochester

About Pre-concert talk: Matthew Suttor brings to life the cultural context of three watershed organ works by Ligeti, Hambraeus, and Kagel commissioned by Radio Bremen in 1962, which brought radical composition techniques to the organ for the first time, as well as Schoenberg's singular Sonata for Organ. His talk offers perspectives on contemporary organ music and particularly the technology and culture that generated the 1960s organ avant-garde.

Dr. Matthew Suttor is the Director of the Laurie Beechman Center for Theatrical Sound Design and Music at the Yale School of Drama.

About the Concert: In 1962, Radio Bremen commissioned three new works for the organ from the leading generalist composers, György Ligeti ("Volumina"), Bengt Hambraeus ("Interferenser") and Mauricio Kagel ("Improvisation ajoutée"). The mission was to search for new ways of composing for the instrument, and particularly to expand its range of expression and dynamics. The challenge was to investigate whether the organ had a place in the mid-20th-century contemporary music scene. The new works were scheduled to be premiered in the cathedral in Bremen in early May 1962, but when the Bauherren (Church Council) and the clergy learnt about the avant-garde character of the program they refused to host the concert. Instead, the works were recorded at two different organs in Sweden and the premier was moved to the Concert Hall in Bremen where the listeners could experience the premier through a sound system. This lecture offers perspectives in the contemporary organ music and particularly the technology and culture that generated the organ avant-garde in the 1960s. The concert features the works of the 1962 Cancelled Concert in Bremen for the first time in the USA.