Calendar: Upcoming CIRTL events

Calendar: Upcoming CIRTL events

For more information on the content of each event, you can log in to the CIRTL webpage.

CIRTL Cross-Network Events are held in Blackboard Collaborate (http://www.cirtl.net/blackboard) , which opens 30 minutes before the session.

  1. Select the "Join the Session" link for an event. (30 minutes before the event)
  2. Enter the required information and click “Log In.”
  3. For Session Login Name, enter your name and institution.

Note: You do not need a CIRTL account in order to attend an event.

NOVEMBER SERIES THEME: The Academic Job Search

This series will look at the various aspects of a faculty member's position; offer strategies for managing personal and institutional expectations; and provide ideas about creating the right career path.

November 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2014: TBA

NO DECEMBER PROGRAM

JANUARY AND FEBRUARY SERIES THEME: Educational Innovation and the Active Classroom

Teaching methods that involve active learning and peer learning are beneficial, but these broad ideas can be implemented in many ways. In this series each session will cover one successful innovation by instructors across the network who have found ways to enhance learning in STEM classes.

January 6, 2015: 12.00pm - 1.00pm

Handheld Devices in Class - Distractors or Aids?Most instructors: (1) Ban technology in class, (2) Use devices for specific purposes, such as 'clicker' for real-time polling, or (3) Leave the challenges of digital self-regulation to students who bring their own device(s) to class. Since 2001, I've been researching the cognitive and educational psychology of learning with digital technology. In this session, we look beyond the increasingly popular formats of flipped, blended or massive online (MOOC) classes to consider new approaches for engaging students during face-to-face meetings. Can devices be used more effectively during class while minimizing the distractions associated with a state of 'continuous partial attention?' I will explain my evolving model for a more 'manageable educational environment for collaboration' or MEEC. It may not be the perfect solution for all courses, but it may generate some new techniques to try in your class, regardless of class size.

Presenter: Ronald Yaros, Associate Professor of Journalism, University of Maryland

Log in here (open 30 minutes before the start of the event)

January 13, 2015: 12.00pm - 1.00pm

Hybrid/Flipped Teaching With In-Class Design and Build ActivitiesIn this session, Dr Peshkin will describe his successful implementation of active learning in his course teaching electronics (for non-EE engineers)using a portable 'lab-in-a-backpack' workbench and real prototyping, not simulation. During most of the class, the students work hands-on, designing, building and debugging their circuits while he circulates and advises. Class includes mini-lectures, and lessons are made available online. For taping short technical lessons, Dr Peshkin uses a zero-postproduction video technology (see lightboard.info for a preview).

Presenter: Michael Peshkin, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University

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January 20, 2015: 12.00pm - 1.00pm

Developing Active Learning Activities for Your STEM Course

Instructors of large-enrollment classes will learn about ways in which to implement active learning in the lecture hall. The process of engaging students from the first class meeting will be outlined, with particular emphasis on strategies to help students to get to know one another and techniques through which the faculty can learn names in the anonymous 'sea' of students. Instructors will learn how to implement, organize and conduct group work within the lecture hall. A few specific examples of active learning exercises will be demonstrated. Finally, instructors will learn about ways to informally assess learning in the lecture hall.

Presenter: Richard Shingles, Lecturer in Biology, Johns Hopkins University

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January 27, 2015: 12.00 - 1.00pm

Scientific Writing in STEM Classes as Cognitive Apprenticeship

Scientists learn how to write scientifically, but how do you teach students to do this? In contrast to lab techniques, where there is often an apprenticeship aspect in which students learn by watching others and then practising, there isn't much to watch while a scientist writes. This needs to be a cognitive apprenticeship instead of a physical one. This session will discuss one way to help undergraduates to learn to write scientifically by making the thought processes about writing more visible.

Presenters: Robert Linsenmeier, Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Neurobiology, Northwestern University

Penny Hirsch, Professor of Instruction, Writing Program, Northwestern University

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February 3, 2015: 12.00pm - 1.00pm

Team-Based Learning (TBL): Active Learning and Differences in Learning

Presenter: Monical Lamm, Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University

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February 10, 2015: 12.00pm - 1.00pm

Developing Simulations as an Educational Strategy

Presenter: Pam Jeffries, Professor of Nursing and Vice-Provost, Digital Initiatives, Johns Hopkins University

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February 17, 2015: 12.00pm - 1.00pm

Conducting Assessments During Your STEM CourseInstructors of large enrollment classes will learn about ways to conduct ongoing formative assessment in their classes. A range of time-sensitive assessment activities will be described, from gauging simple comprehension to formal evaluation of class concepts. A discussion of what to do with the feedback will follow.

Presenter: Richard Shingles, Lecturer in Biology, Johns Hopkins University

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February 24, 2015: 12.00pm - 1.00pm

'Size Counts' and Other Fallacies of Successful Active Learning Strategies

The most common statement that Dr Hadingham hears from faculty regarding active learning is that it 'simply can't be done in a large class'/ She's heard similar sentiments expressed about small and medium-sized classes, too. This begs the question: Why not? What is it about active learning techniques that make them seem impossible? Or at least, incredibly difficult, and not worth the effort, no matter what the class size? In this session, Dr Hadingham aims to try and re-frame the fallacy that there is an 'ideal' size for effective active learning, and suggest strategies that can be used in classes of any size. In order to make this session as practical as possible, she would welcome any specific questions about active learning in the college classroom that the CIRTL community might have (jennifer.hadingham@rochester.edu).

Presenter: Jenny Hadingham, Assistant Director & Lecturer, Centere for Excellence in teaching & Learning (CETL), University of Rochester

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MARCH SERIES THEME: Surviving the First Year as Faculty Member

This series will focus on the basics, as well as the nuances, of finding, interviewing, and being offered the 'right' academic position based on students' skills and interests.

March 3, 10, 17 and 24, 2015: TBA

APRIL SERIES THEME: Personal Financial Management

This series will help graduate students and postdocs build knowledge and confidence about personal finances through presentations and panel discussions by faculty and staff from the CIRTL network and beyond.

*Note: March 31 will be included in this series and no session will be held on April 14.

March 31, 2015: 2.00pm - 3.00pm

Strategies for Success in Personal Finance

This session is offered by financial planning graduate students - for graduate students. We will focus on the essential building blocks of personal financial success. This interactive session will help current graduate students and postdocs develop critical thinking skills for financial decision-making both now and when you start your career. Learn about tools and strategies for budgeting, becoming informed consumers, and interacting with financial service professionals. The session will be tailored to participant needs; you will be asked to complete a short survey beforehand.

Presenter: Abby Belvin, Graduate Associate in Family Financial Planning, Iowa State University

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April 7, 2015: 2.00pm - 3.00pm

Investment Basics: Saving for Your Life Goals

As you start to accumulate money to fund your future goals, do you know how and where to best put that money to work? Just placing your money in a savings account will not cut it as taxes and inflation will quickly erode your buying power. The world of investing can be extremely intimidating, and the messages we hear from the media, our family and friends can be confusing. This session will focus on basic investment fundamentals. By the end of the session, you will be able to describe th the building blocks of an investment portfolio in relation to your tolerance for risk and your investment time horizon.

Presenter: Paul Strebel, CPA, CFP, co-founder of the Strebel Planning Group

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April 21, 2015: 2.00pm - 3.00pm

Financially Inclusive Teaching and Advising

Many undergraduate institutions include students from a range of economic backgrounds and circumstances. Costs associated with individual courses and academic experiences can be challenging for some students to meet. Providing access to higher education doesn't stop with providing financial aid and loans to cover tuition, it includes designing academic experiences with sensitivity to student financial abilities. This session will focus on principles to guide you and actions you can take as a teacher and adviser to consider and address financial hurdles your students may face in courses and other academic experiences.

Presenters: A.T. Miller, Associate Vice-Provost for Academic Diversity, Cornell University

William Horning, Associate Director, Office of Academic diversity Initiatives, and Director, Student Opportunity Programs, Cornell University

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April 28, 2015: 2.00pm - 3.00pm

Student Loans: What You Need to Know

With student loans often in the news, and your role as someone having or working with students who have them, it is important that you understand both federal and private student loans. This session will focus on loans as a means to help finance higher education, and will touch on national trends. We will clarify the different types of student loans available, and will discuss how to manage your spending while in school and borrow smart. Planning to repay a student loan is critical in this process; the session will show you how to estimate what you will owe and help you understand repayment options, including deferments/forbearance, forgiveness/discharges, and consolidation.

Presenter: Gretchen Ryan, Associate Director of Customer Service, Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment, Cornell University.

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