Courses — Fall 2014

For official course schedules, restrictions, classrooms, and current enrollments, check the Registrar's schedule.
More current syllabi and course information might be available for students on my.rochester.edu.

Political Science

PSC/IR 101 Introduction to Comparative Politics

Bonnie M. Meguid
Fall 2014 — MWF 10:25-11:15
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

Restriction: Open to freshmen only. This course will introduce students to comparative politics and the study of domestic political institutions, processes, and outcomes across and within countries. These important themes and concepts of contemporary comparative politics include the vibrancy of democracy, the centrality of political and electoral institutions, the possibility of revolution and the power of ethnicity. Cases will be drawn from different countries and historical periods to give students a grounding in the method of comparative analysis. This course is recommended for those thinking about a major, minor, or cluster in political science or international relations and others who are simply interested in learning more about the politics of developed and developing countries.

PSC/IR 106 Introduction to International Relations

William Spaniel
Fall 2014 — MWF 9:00-9:50
Political Science Field: International Relations, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

This course provides students with the background and conceptual tools they need to understand contemporary international relations. The course will introduce students to the wide range of issues that make up the study of international relations, including the workings of the state system, the causes of international conflict and violence, and international economic relations. Students will be introduced to the literature in a broad way, to make them familiar with the main theoretical traditions in the field. Students will be asked, as much as possible, to read original texts, rather than a textbook. Time permitting, we will also examine topics of particular current interest, such as the evolving nature of power in the post-Cold War environment as well as special global challenges like nation-building and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

PSC 107 Introduction to Positive Political Theory

Stuart Jordan
Fall 2014 — MWF 9:00-9:50
Political Science Field: Positive Theory, Introductory Courses
Typically offered every year

This course introduces students to positive political theory, a rigorous set of tools that helps clarify key questions in political science. Through examples drawn from all aspects of the political process (from elections to lawmaking to regulation) as well as from everyday life (where should we go for dinner?) and Hollywood (Russell Crowe and Reese Witherspoon as political scientists?), we will study how the rules of the game affect the decisions politicians make as well as the policy outcomes we observe.

PSC 202 Argument in Political Science

Gerald Gamm
Fall 2014 — MWF 11:50-12:40
Political Science Field: Required Course
Typically offered every year

Restriction: Not open to freshmen. Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists. This version of the course focuses on the tension between majority rule and minority rights in the American political tradition. Issues include tyranny of the majority, slavery, individual rights, civic engagement, parties and interest groups, international diplomacy, legislative organization, and representation. Readings are drawn from classic texts in American thought--the Declaration of Independence, "The Federalist," Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," the Gettysburg Address--as well as from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. Note: In this academic year, PSC 202 will only be offered in the fall semester. It will NOT be offered in the spring.

PSC 203 Survey Research Methods

Mitch Sanders
Fall 2014 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

Public opinion surveys are a vital component of contemporary politics. In this course we will explore the fundamental elements of survey research: selecting a sample, designing and implementing a questionnaire, interpreting the results, and presenting the findings. This semester, we will pay special attention to surveys about current public policy issues like the environment, immigration, and health care. We will also examine polling done for the 2012 presidential election and the 2014 congressional elections. PSC 203 satisfies the Techniques of Analysis requirement for undergraduate majors and minors in political science.

PSC 214 Empirical Controversies in American Politics

Kevin A. Clarke
Fall 2014 ("W" Optional) — W 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered

This seminar considers a number of controversies in American politics that can be studied with data. Topics include liberal bias in the media, the effect of capital punishment on crime, and the relationship between money and elections, among others. The course will be a small seminar and will use a discussion format. Each student will be expected to read the assigned material before class and to take turns summarizing and critiquing particular readings. Grades will be based on presentations, class discussions, and a final research paper. PSC 200 or its equivalent is a prerequisite.

PSC 223 Constitutional Structure and Rights

Thomas H. Jackson
Fall 2014 — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

In this course, through the lens of the Constitution and Supreme Court cases, we examine the essential structure of the American legal system (both separation of powers at the federal level and the authority of, and relationship among, states and the federal government), as well as the essential nature of civil rights of citizens vis-a-vis the political order. Topics covered include the nature of the Supreme Court's authority; separation of powers; federal limits on state powers; and individual rights, including economic rights, certain of the rights embraced by the First, Fourth, and Fifth Amendments, and equal protection rights under the Fourteenth Amendment. The ability to read and discuss (as well as place in perspective and disagree with) Supreme Court opinions is an essential part of the course.

PSC 232 Controversies in Public Policy

Bruce Jacobs
Fall 2014 — MW 12:30-13:45
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every other year

This course will consider a number of public policies over which there is much disagreement - mandating health insurance, the future of Social Security, how (or whether) to balance the federal budget, racial discrimination in employment, global warming, public financing of family planning, and the like. The purpose of the course is to arrive at an understanding of both sides of the issues so that they can be discussed intelligently.

PSC 236 Health Care and the Law

Margie Hodges Shaw
Fall 2014 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Typically offered every year

This course provides an introduction to the legal foundations of health care in America. It is the responsibility of the American government to promote and protect the health and welfare of the public while respecting the interests, and upholding the rights, of the individual. The content of this course addresses how the law balances these collective and individual rights. The material covers a broad range of legal issues in health care, including autonomy, privacy, liberty, and proprietary interests, from the perspective of the provider(s) and the patient.

PSC 238 Business and Politics

David Primo
Fall 2014 — TR 12:30-13:45
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every other year

The focus of this course is the conflict and cooperation between business and government, with an emphasis on U.S. domestic politics. We will cover a broad range of issues affecting the business world, including regulation, lawmaking, the mass media, interest group activism, and crisis management. The course will connect ongoing political debates to theory, and guest speakers will bring their business and political experience to our class. Each meeting will feature a general topic, as well as in-depth analyses of real-world cases related to that topic. What happens when Wal-Mart tries to open a new store in a city with strong unions? Who is opposed to grocery stores selling wine, and why? How did General Motors fight back against a media report critical of its products? Is "corporate social responsibility" actually irresponsible? These are just a few of the questions we'll answer during the semester, all while developing an understanding of what happens when politics meets economics.

PSC 241 Urban Change and City Politics

Gerald Gamm
Fall 2014 ("W" Optional) — T 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered rarely

Through intensive reading and discussion, we examine the politics and history of American cities. While we read scholarship drawing on the experiences of an array of cities--including Chicago, New York, Detroit, Boston, Oakland, Philadelphia, San Diego, Albuquerque, Phoenix, New Haven, Atlanta, Buffalo, and Charlotte--our emphasis is on commonalities in the urban experience as well as on systematic differences. We analyze the relationship of cities to their hinterlands in the early stages of urban development, the rise of ethnic neighborhoods, suburbanization, industrialization, de-industrialization, housing and jobs, concentrated poverty, and population changes. Race, ethnicity, and class are central to this course, not only in understanding changes in neighborhoods but also in the nature of politics and governmental arrangements.

PSC 245 Aging and Public Policy

Bruce Jacobs
Fall 2014 ("W" Optional) — MW 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every year

The course will cover policies in such areas as social security, public assistance, health care, and social services for the elderly. The factual and philosophical assumptions underlying each policy will be examined, as will the division of responsibilities between public and private institutions and individuals. A variety of books, articles, and official publications that bear on the issues covered will be assigned.

PSC 246 Environmental Law and Policy

Terry Noto
Fall 2014 — TR 15:25-16:40
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Typically offered rarely

An examination of federal environmental law and policy from a practical and historical perspective. This course will provide a basic foundational understanding of U.S. environmental law and help students develop the tools necessary to critique and improve environmental policy making. Topics include an overview of key federal environmental laws, some of the major loopholes, how environmental laws are shaped through agency regulation, judicial interpretation, political pressure, and their efficacy at safeguarding the environment and the public. The course will be taught through a combination of lectures, a group project focused on a specific case study, and student-led discussions about key aspects of environmental laws. Students will finish by considering emerging environmental issues and ways to address them.

PSC/IR 260 Contemporary African Politics

Robin Harding
Fall 2014 ("W" Optional) — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course provides an introduction to the major issues in contemporary African politics. The questions we will consider include: What are the legacies of slavery and colonialism? What accounts for the variation in political institutions across Africa? Why have so many African countries experienced political violence? And, how do political institutions influence development in Africa? We will do so by examining individual countries, as well as evidence from broad cross-national studies.

PSC/IR 267 Identity, Ethnicity and Nationalism

Bonnie M. Meguid
Fall 2014 — MW 14:00-15:15
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This course explores the concepts of identity, ethnicity and nationalism from a comparative perspective. Drawing upon theories from political science, anthropology, sociology and economics, we will examine how identity is defined and how societies use these constructions in, among other things, nation-building, war, and party competition. Theoretical readings will be supplemented with empirical studies from developed and developing countries across different time periods.

PSC/IR 270 Mechanisms of International Relations

Philip Arena
Fall 2014 — MWF 10:25-11:15
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

This course consists of two parts. First, we will explore the logic of several causal mechanisms that help us to better understand patterns of international cooperation (such as coordination and collaboration problems), discussing several empirical applications. Second, we will explore the logic of several causal mechanisms that help us to better understand patterns of international conflict (such as commitment and information problems), discussing several empirical applications. Game-theoretic and statistical models will appear throughout the course, but no prior background in either is assumed or required.

PSC/IR 273 The Politics of Terrorism

Alexander Lee
Fall 2014 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

Over the past century, terrorism has become a common feature of world politics, enabling small groups of individuals to have a disproportionate influence on the politics of both developed and underdeveloped countries. This course explores some of the fundamental questions of terrorism: Why individuals join terrorist groups, why terrorist groups adopt certain tactics such as suicide bombing, how terrorist groups organize themselves, and what counterterrorism strategies are effective? No previous knowledge of the subject is required.

PSC/IR 274 International Political Economy

Shu Yu
Fall 2014 — MW 9:00-10:15
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)
Typically offered every other year

This course explores the interaction between politics and economics at the international level as well as between the international and domestic levels, involving various actors such as governments, interest groups, and multinational corporations. As an interdisciplinary field related to both international politics and international economics, international political economy examines the management and openness of the international economy, the determinants of foreign economic policy-making on topics such as trade, foreign exchange, capital controls, the politics of economic development, the effects of domestic political competition on international trade and capital flows, the determinants of regional integration, as well as the spread or containment of international financial crises. Students are expected to complete oral and written assignments which are designed to help them develop their problem solving, writing and presentation skills.

PSC 281 Formal Models in Political Science

John Duggan
Fall 2014 — TR 12:30-13:45
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

This course explores the rational choice approach to understanding political phenomena. The main results of social choice theory, game theory, and spatial modeling are presented through application to a broad range of political situations: voting, legislative politics, political campaigns, comparison of electoral systems, the evolution of cooperation, and international relations. While there are no formal mathematical prerequisites for the course, some familiarity with mathematical reasoning and formalism is a must.

PSC 287 Theories of Political Economy

James Johnson
Fall 2014 ("W" Optional) — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Political Philosophy, Positive Theory
Typically offered

In recent decades a number of important intellectual intersections have emerged between political science and economics. The course will explore these intersections as they appear in the work of several scholars who have won the Nobel Prize in economics. Our aim is to explore the analytical, explanatory and normative implications of this work in hopes of discerning lessons for thinking about enduring political issues and institutions. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required.

PSC 288 Game Theory

Paulo Barelli
Fall 2014 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

ECO 207 is a prerequisite for this course. Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his or her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is required.

PSC 385 Legal Reasoning & Argument

Anant Kishore
Fall 2014 — MW 16:50-19:30
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Typically offered every year

This course will help students understand the patterns of legal reasoning and argument and to develop skills in formulating, presenting and critiquing legal arguments. Students will learn the theory behind the adversarial system and the various procedural and evidentiary rules in place to achieve the system's goals. Drawing on theories of legal argument from texts such as "Legal Argument: The Structure and Language of Effective Advocacy" and "The Five Types of Legal Argument," students will practice the techniques used to conduct legal trials, including opening statements, direct examinations, cross examinations, closing arguments, and objections. Grading will be based on a combination of traditional assignments and quizzes as well as on practical exercises performed individually as well as in teams. The final examination will consist of a mock trial between two or more teams using a fictional fact pattern involving a civil or criminal case.

PSC 394 Local Law and Politics Internships

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2014 ("W" Optional)
Political Science Field: Internship
Typically offered every semester

Most internship placements are in the District Attorney's or Public Defender's offices or in the local offices of U.S. members of Congress or Senators. Other internships are available depending on student interest. Interns work 10-12 hours per week through the entire semester. Grades are primarily based on a research paper. Applicants should have an appropriate course background for the internship and at least a B average. Students must be accepted in the course before approaching an agency for an internship. Applications are available from Professor L. Powell and an interest meeting is held just before preregistration each semester.

PSC 396 Washington Semester

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2014
Political Science Field: Internship
Typically offered every semester

These internships provide an opportunity to learn experientially one or more of the following: how government functions; how public policies are created, adopted and implemented; and how political campaigns work. Students intern in Congress, the executive branch, party campaign committees, and lobbying and advocacy groups. For applications and information, students should contact Professor L. Powell. An interest meeting is held each semester.

PSC/IR 397 European Political Internship

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2014
Political Science Field: Internship
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every semester

Internships are available for students in Edinburgh, London, Brussels, Bonn, Berlin and Madrid. Internships are in English in Edinburgh, London, and Brussels: students need proficiency in the language for the latter four placements. For applications and information, students should contact the Study Abroad Office in Dewey Hall 2147.

PSC 404 Probability and Inference

Kevin A. Clarke
Fall 2014 — TR 16:50-18:05
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

This course in mathematical statistics provides graduate students in political science with a solid foundation in probability and statistical inference. The focus of the course is on the empirical modeling of non-experimental data. While substantive political science will never be far from our minds, our primary goal is to acquire the tools necessary for success in the rest of the econometric sequence. As such, this course serves as a prerequisite for the advanced political science graduate courses in statistical methods (PSC 405, 505, and 506).

PSC 407 Mathematical Modeling

Mark Fey
Fall 2014 — MW 10:00-12:00
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

This course is the first half of a two-course sequence consisting of PSC 407 and PSC 408. The goal of the sequence is to give a rigorous introduction to the main concepts and results in positive political theory. At the same time, we will teach you the mathematical tools necessary to understand these results, to use them and (if it suits you) to surpass them in your own research in political science. The course will emphasize rigorous logical and deductive reasoning - this skill will prove valuable, even to the student primarily interested in empirical analysis rather than modeling. The sequence is designed to be both a rigorous foundation for students planning on taking further courses in the positive political theory field and a self-contained overview of the field for students who do not intend to do additional coursework in the field. The sequence will cover both social choice theory, which concerns finding an axiomatic basis for collective decision making, and game theory, which analyzes individual behavior in strategic situations. Students should have, at a minimum, a sound familiarity with basic algebra (solving equations, graphing functions, etc.) and a knowledge of basic calculus. Consistent with department policy, students are required to attend the "math" camp offered in the weeks before the first fall semester.

PSC 487 Theories of Political Economy

James Johnson
Fall 2014 — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Political Philosophy
Typically offered

Restriction: Instructor permission required. In recent decades a number of important intellectual intersections have emerged between political science and economics. The course will explore these intersections as they appear in the work of several scholars who have won the Nobel Prize in economics. Our aim is to explore the analytically, explanatory and normative implications of this work in hopes of discerning lessons for thinking about enduring political issues and institutions. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required.

PSC 505 Maximum Likelihood Estimation

Curtis S. Signorino
Fall 2014 — TR 10:30-12:00
Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis
Typically offered every year

The classical linear regression model is inappropriate for many of the most interesting problems in political science. This course builds upon the analytical foundations of PSC 404 and 405, taking the latter's emphasis on the classical linear model as its point of departure. Here students will learn methods to analyze models and data for event counts, durations, censoring, truncation, selection, multinomial ordered/unordered categories, strategic choices, spatial voting models, and time series. A major goal of the course will be to teach students how to develop new models and techniques for analyzing issues they encounter in their own research.

PSC 535 Bureaucratic Politics

Lawrence Rothenberg
Fall 2014 — F 9:30-12:00
Political Science Field: American Politics
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This course will survey recent research on the politics of bureaucracy. We will begin with a study of why and when elected politicians create bureaucracies and delegate authority to them. We will then study a series of topics regarding the operation and design of existing bureaucracies. Depending on the interest of students, topics may include: oversight and control of bureaucracies by elected politicians; bureaucratic capacity and performance; the political economy of regulatory bureaucracies; "red tape" and corruption; judicial control of bureaucracy; institutions and practices for the staffing of bureaucracies (e.g. patronage systems); advisory bureaucracies and bureaucratic expertise in policymaking; and military and intelligence bureaucracies. The course will draw heavily, but not exclusively, on formal theories and statistical evidence. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, or at least one course in Techniques of Analysis at the 200 level or above and one course in Positive Theory at the 200 level or above.

PSC 555 Democratic Political Processes

G. Bingham Powell, Jr., Tasos Kalandrakis
Fall 2014 — T 12:30-15:15
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This course is a graduate seminar, involving collective discussion of core readings and student presentations on special topics and specific countries. The comparative democratic political processes subfield focuses on the process of choosing political leaders and making political decisions in the context of competitive elections and relative freedom of political action. We begin by discussing the empirical meaning of contemporary democracies, the nature of democratic transitions, and the effect of social and economic context. We then take quick looks at differing citizen values, constitutional rules, and the comparative study of citizens' attitudes and behavior. The second half of the course focuses on groups and, especially, political parties: competition, organization, coalitions, legislative and executive behavior, connections between citizens and policy makers. Although for graduate students the course fulfills requirements for the democratic political processes subfield in comparative politics, no specific background is assumed and the course is appropriate for any graduate student.

PSC 565 Political Economy of Development

Robin Harding, Alexander Lee
Fall 2014 — W 14:45-17:25
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
Typically offered every year

This course surveys selected topics in the extensive literature on political and economic development. We will focus on differences in formal and informal institutions across countries. Topics will include the determinants of economic growth, the modernization hypothesis, distributional conflict, government corruption, the success and failure of states to deliver of public goods, among others.

PSC 575 Political Economy I

John Duggan
Fall 2014 — MW 10:00-12:00
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

Models-based course covering fundamental topics in theoretical political economy. Voting, electoral competition, special interest politics and political accountability. Highlights include institutional features shaping public policy and institutional design. Collective decisions viewed as outcomes of game played by individual decision-makers. Empirical motivations for and implications of the political economy models will be discussed.

PSC 579 Politics of International Finance

Randall Stone
Fall 2014 — F 9:30-12:00
Political Science Field: International Relations
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This course surveys the politics of international movements of capital, focusing on money as a power resource, the evolution of international cooperation in monetary policy, international financial institutions, and the domestic politics of macroeconomic adjustment.

PSC 581 Foundations of Political Theory

James Johnson
Fall 2014 — R 14:00-16:40
Political Science Field: Political Philosophy
Typically offered every year

This seminar addresses different topics in different years. This year (Fall 2014) the topic will be Democratic Theory. We will read a range of classic and contemporary works on a variety of topics in this domain. The primary focus will be on the role of democratic decision-making mechanisms in the design and re-design of political-economic institutions.

PSC 584 Game Theory

Mark Fey
Fall 2014 — MW 13:00-14:30
Political Science Field: Positive Theory
Typically offered every year

This course is the third semester of the formal theory sequence for graduate students. It focuses on teaching students more sophisticated tools for modeling more complex games. Specifically, the course concentrates on games of incomplete information such as signaling games and communication games and develops analytical tools such as Bayesian-Nash equilibrium, perfect Bayesian equilibrium, and equilibrium refinements. The course also covers repeated games, bargaining games and equilibrium existence in a rigorous fashion. The prerequisites for the course are PSC 407 and 408, or an equivalent background in complete information game theory. Grading is based on homework assignments and a midterm and final exam.

International Relations

PSC/IR 101 Introduction to Comparative Politics

Bonnie M. Meguid
Fall 2014 — MWF 10:25-11:15
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

Restriction: Open to freshmen only. This course will introduce students to comparative politics and the study of domestic political institutions, processes, and outcomes across and within countries. These important themes and concepts of contemporary comparative politics include the vibrancy of democracy, the centrality of political and electoral institutions, the possibility of revolution and the power of ethnicity. Cases will be drawn from different countries and historical periods to give students a grounding in the method of comparative analysis. This course is recommended for those thinking about a major, minor, or cluster in political science or international relations and others who are simply interested in learning more about the politics of developed and developing countries.

PSC/IR 106 Introduction to International Relations

William Spaniel
Fall 2014 — MWF 9:00-9:50
Political Science Field: International Relations, Introductory Courses
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

This course provides students with the background and conceptual tools they need to understand contemporary international relations. The course will introduce students to the wide range of issues that make up the study of international relations, including the workings of the state system, the causes of international conflict and violence, and international economic relations. Students will be introduced to the literature in a broad way, to make them familiar with the main theoretical traditions in the field. Students will be asked, as much as possible, to read original texts, rather than a textbook. Time permitting, we will also examine topics of particular current interest, such as the evolving nature of power in the post-Cold War environment as well as special global challenges like nation-building and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

IR 217 How Countries Become Rich

Adam Cohon
Fall 2014 — MW 11:50-13:05
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B), Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered rarely

Why are some countries rich and well-developed while other countries remain underdeveloped and poor? What role do political institutions, both domestic and outward-oriented, play in economic development? In this course we examine classic and contemporary answers to these questions, and consider evidence for competing explanations. We start with Adam Smith, and move through theories of dependency, import substitution, and export-based development. We conclude with contemporary theories on the connection between economic development and political institutions. We explore national economies from all continents, with special emphasis on countries outside the North Atlantic that have grown and developed, to varying extents, since World War II. (This course was formerly titled "States and Markets.")

IR 230 American Foreign Policy

Philip Arena
Fall 2014 — MWF 11:50-12:40
Political Science Field: Associated Courses
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered rarely

This course consists of two parts. First, we will discuss the optimal use of various foreign policy instruments, such as militarized and economic coercion, foreign aid, and mulitlateralism. Second, we will discuss the policy formation process, assessing the relative impact of the general public, interest groups, Congress, and the president. Game-theoretic models will appear throughout the course, but no prior background is assumed or required. Students are strongly encouraged to keep up with current events. (This course was formerly titled "The Tools of U.S. Foreign Policy.")

PSC/IR 260 Contemporary African Politics

Robin Harding
Fall 2014 ("W" Optional) — TR 11:05-12:20
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every year

This course provides an introduction to the major issues in contemporary African politics. The questions we will consider include: What are the legacies of slavery and colonialism? What accounts for the variation in political institutions across Africa? Why have so many African countries experienced political violence? And, how do political institutions influence development in Africa? We will do so by examining individual countries, as well as evidence from broad cross-national studies.

PSC/IR 267 Identity, Ethnicity and Nationalism

Bonnie M. Meguid
Fall 2014 — MW 14:00-15:15
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every 2-3 years

This course explores the concepts of identity, ethnicity and nationalism from a comparative perspective. Drawing upon theories from political science, anthropology, sociology and economics, we will examine how identity is defined and how societies use these constructions in, among other things, nation-building, war, and party competition. Theoretical readings will be supplemented with empirical studies from developed and developing countries across different time periods.

PSC/IR 270 Mechanisms of International Relations

Philip Arena
Fall 2014 — MWF 10:25-11:15
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

This course consists of two parts. First, we will explore the logic of several causal mechanisms that help us to better understand patterns of international cooperation (such as coordination and collaboration problems), discussing several empirical applications. Second, we will explore the logic of several causal mechanisms that help us to better understand patterns of international conflict (such as commitment and information problems), discussing several empirical applications. Game-theoretic and statistical models will appear throughout the course, but no prior background in either is assumed or required.

PSC/IR 273 The Politics of Terrorism

Alexander Lee
Fall 2014 — TR 9:40-10:55
Political Science Field: International Relations
International Relations Track: Global Security (A)
Typically offered every year

Over the past century, terrorism has become a common feature of world politics, enabling small groups of individuals to have a disproportionate influence on the politics of both developed and underdeveloped countries. This course explores some of the fundamental questions of terrorism: Why individuals join terrorist groups, why terrorist groups adopt certain tactics such as suicide bombing, how terrorist groups organize themselves, and what counterterrorism strategies are effective? No previous knowledge of the subject is required.

PSC/IR 274 International Political Economy

Shu Yu
Fall 2014 — MW 9:00-10:15
Political Science Field: Comparative Politics, International Relations
International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)
Typically offered every other year

This course explores the interaction between politics and economics at the international level as well as between the international and domestic levels, involving various actors such as governments, interest groups, and multinational corporations. As an interdisciplinary field related to both international politics and international economics, international political economy examines the management and openness of the international economy, the determinants of foreign economic policy-making on topics such as trade, foreign exchange, capital controls, the politics of economic development, the effects of domestic political competition on international trade and capital flows, the determinants of regional integration, as well as the spread or containment of international financial crises. Students are expected to complete oral and written assignments which are designed to help them develop their problem solving, writing and presentation skills.

PSC/IR 397 European Political Internship

Lynda W. Powell
Fall 2014
Political Science Field: Internship
International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)
Typically offered every semester

Internships are available for students in Edinburgh, London, Brussels, Bonn, Berlin and Madrid. Internships are in English in Edinburgh, London, and Brussels: students need proficiency in the language for the latter four placements. For applications and information, students should contact the Study Abroad Office in Dewey Hall 2147.